Food Photography Tips & Tricks on Photoshelter

Croissant & Latte

Lauren Margolis posted a great piece today on Photoshelter’s blog with some food photography tips from photographers like yours truly.

Food photography, however, plays a huge role across many different businesses. Previously limited to the food industry (restaurants, markets, specialty food stores) and food-dedicated publications, food photography now spans a wide breath of editorial publications and commercial/advertising campaigns. Food is most often associated with comfort and happiness, so it’s no surprise that clients like American Express and CNN are now seeking food photographers.

Bottom line? No matter what kind of photographer you call yourself, it’s advantageous to have some food photography skills under your belt. You’ll also want to stand out from the crowd of amateur food photographers – showing clients that you have the experience and know-how to deliver the best images.

Keep reading on Back to Basics: Food Photography Lighting & Styling.

This Way

This Way

When I ran into this sign, I headed out in the direction it was pointing. For me, that’s what photo walks are all about. Taking cues from around you and seeing where it take you. I love doing this in foreign countries, especially when the language (or characters) mean nothing to me. You really don’t know where you’ll end up.

Korea Divided – Seoul 2012

Korea Divided

I took this shot because to me it symbolized the division of North and South Korea. The South is bustling with industry and urbanism. The North is a mysterious place obscured by rumors and propaganda. During my trip to South Korea last year, I couldn’t help but feel this divide all around me. It was a sad and lonely feeling mixed with the ever present fear of war and destruction.

Le Buci – Paris, France

The last few years have been all about work, getting more work, and shooting lots of work. Which is great and I can’t begin to say how grateful I am to have great clients that hire me all the time. But lately, I’ve had a feeling that something is missing in my career. It’s like my creative muscles are out of shape. A lot of what I shoot is about how other people feel and see the world. Shooting buildings, interiors, even food is all about someone else’s creativity. I just have the craftsmanship to capture it succinctly. I’ve lost touch with what I want to say about life through photography. Today that changes.

When I first started photoblogging, I was seeking my vision and style. I definitely found it and it helped my career tremendously. It’s time to once again to start showing personal work regularly here on Ides of May. I will post something every day, Monday through Friday. I may not write a lot, but I will try to explain why I posted what I posted.

On my last trip to Paris, I regretted bringing my big camera and lenses. It literally weighed me down and made walking around the city more of chore than a pleasure. I was constantly worried about my gear being stolen, especially my
24mm Canon TS-E II
. That lens is my workhorse.

However, maybe all the hassle was worth it to get this shot. Yeah, I could have used post production to fix the perspective. But it was so cool to stand on the street corner, lens shifted up and just wait for this moment.

Recycled Kitchen in HGTV Magazine

HGTV Magazine - Shannon Quimby's Recycled Kitchen

For the June issue of HGTV Magazine, I shot a very cool and eco-friendly kitchen in Southeast Portland. In this beautiful kitchen makeover, Shannon Quimby expertly used existing materials from the original home and found objects for both decor and function Her take on on reclaimed interior design is creative, but also very approachable. There are definitely some good tips in here for you DIY remodelers.

Here is the rest of the four spread and a gallery of the shots on their own. Look for this spread in HGTV Magazine on newsstands now!

HGTV Magazine - Shannon Quimby's Recycled Kitchen

HGTV Magazine - Shannon Quimby's Recycled Kitchen

Continue reading “Recycled Kitchen in HGTV Magazine” »

Twenty Years of Picture Making

Lincoln Barbour in High School

Today is my 36th birthday. Which means, 20 years ago I took my first black and white photography class in high school. Though I chose photography as career only 12 years ago, there’s something about the picture making process that has fascinated me since the beginning. I think what I like most about photography is that it never ceases reinventing itself nor does it ever stop challenging me. Not matter how much I master the art form, I constantly want to learn more to improve what I can do with it.

As my approach and style have evolved over the years, I too have changed and grown as a man. I was a kid when I took the picture above and now I’m a dad in the picture below. Photography has always been this reflection of my life and each frame leaves breadcrumbs of where I’ve been and who I was. Going back and looking at work I’ve shot over the years, shows me how far I’ve come and how much farther I can go.

Here’s to the next 20 years of adventure, one frame at a time.

– Lincoln

Lincoln Barbour