Country Living – Cloverfield Farm

I have to admit, one of the biggest perks to my editorial shoots is meeting incredible people and spending time in their beautiful homes. Such is the case of Cloverfield Farm recently featured in Country Living Magazine. This stunning rustic barn home is the dream effort of the sweetest couple Jessica & Kevin Carnell. Jessica has a great Instagram feed (@growing_cloverfield_farm) of the whole project from start to finish. They were incredibly hospitable, making us feel very welcome and even cooking some amazing food. Check out this spread on my Instagram feed (@growing_cloverfield_farm). I really enjoyed this shoot and got some wonderful images as well. To see more images from the shoot, visit the Work Section of my website.

Hunter Douglas Beauty Books

I recently added a new Featured Work Gallery for two shoots I did for Hunter Douglas’s Luminette and Nantucket product lines. The photos we created for these shoots were used in their dealer sample books, website, social media, marketing materials, you name it!

Both shoots were HUGE productions. Unlike other architectural product shoots where the product is already in place, we had to find locations with the right type of windows and then Hunter Douglas custom made their window fashions to fit the locations. We did multiple days of location scouting about month before each shoot. Hunter Douglas then fabricated the custom product and shipped them to me for holding; something like 70 boxes, 4 to 10 ft in length, and a foot or so wide. It was quite a logistical challenge to find a place to store them for the shoots. I ended up renting a warehouse for one shoot and a conference room at our hotel for the other.

In addition to my producer, two assistants, and a digital tech, we had a crew of about dozen including a lead stylist, stylist assistants, installers, furniture movers, plus an art director and 3 or 4 clients at a time. Lots of people! On our last shoot in San Diego, we had so many people we just hired a food truck to cater. It was awesome and delicious.

Each shot requires a lot of set up. Just installing the product can take half a day. Once the product is up, we then compose, style, and light each shot. We’re maybe getting 1 to 2 hero shots done in a day at each location.

Gear wise, I used the ALPA Max and Alpa XY with the Phase One IQ250 Digital Back. I won’t geek out too much on gear here, but if you’re interested check out the links above.

It’s been a great brand to shoot for and the people I work for are just awesome. For as big as these shoots were, both went off without a hitch and the client was super happy with results. It must be going well, because they’re having me out again this year for a 10 day shoot in June.

High Fives to all the folks I’ve worked with on these shoots, especially Karen Beck, Heather Smith, Bergren Rameson, Mike Grippi, Ben Canales, Kennett Morhman, and Garrett Priddy. Love you all!

Check out the full gallery of images here: https://www.lincolnbarbour.com/work/hunter-douglas/

Thanks!

2016 in Review

Wow, where does the time go! This is my first “Year in Review” since 2011. Why the long drought? Well, the biggest change was that we welcomed our firstborn, Odin, in December of 2012. Two years later, came his sister Teagan in December of 2014. Three short months later, we moved back to Virginia to be closer to family. Yeah, it’s been a little busy.

2016 was my first full year back on the East Coast and it was a really good year for my business. It did come with some sacrifice though. Now that I’m based in a small town, I have to travel a lot more than I did when I was based in Portland. Of the 35 shoots I did last year, only 4 were in Charlottesville and just 16 in Virginia. I’ve flown more miles for work in the last two years than I did in the last 5 years I lived in Portland. I’ve had shoots in Buffalo, New York City, The Hamptons, LA, Silicon Valley, DC, Ohio, Maryland, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, San Diego, and have been back to Portland, OR 3 times. I was on the road or flying for 57 days in 2016 with one shoot lasting almost two weeks.

I really have to thank my wonderful wife, Lauren, and our family in Virginia for their support and help with our young family during this time of transition. I feel very grateful to have them so that I can do something I love for a living and that it’s able to help support a family of 4 (7 if you count our three cats ūüôā

On to the work. I have a lot of images to share and I’ll give a brief comment what each shoot was for. Coming soon will be a big update to my portfolios featuring work I’ve shot for Hunter Douglas, Better Homes & Gardens, Country Living, Prometheus Real Estate Group, and many more. Thanks for visiting and looking forward to an even better 2017.

Country Living Cover Feature – I actually shot this in 2015, but it wasn’t published until January of 2016. A cover feature is a really nice way to start the year. Shot in Franklin, TN (near Nashville), I had a great time on this shoot because it was a beautiful home to photograph and, more importantly, the owners were so friendly. They had that true Southern Charm that just makes you feel like you’ve known them for years.

One of my trips back to Portland included doing a shoot of Jessica Helgerson’s new office space in downtown. It’s amazing open space and the front lobby is used a gallery. When I shot it, the installation I HAVE LOVE IN MY HEART AS A THIEF HAS RICHES by Mike Rathbun was truly something to behold.

Continue reading “2016 in Review” »

Play by Play of a Full Day Interior Design Photo Shoot

Saul Zaik is well known¬†architect that’s famous for his Pacific¬†Northwest take on mid-century modern¬†design. He’s been practicing architecture since 1952 and I was lucky enough to photograph a Jessica Helgerson Interior Design remodel of one of his houses in the West Hills of Portland, OR.

For a different take on my typical blog post, I thought I’d do a play by play of each shot I took throughout the day and describe what it takes to pull off a typical one day interior design shoot.

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1st Shot – South Elevation
Since my client’s needs were¬†more interior design related, we only took one main exterior shot that showed off the work they did. This angle shows the new home color, new deck, and patio furniture. I debated long and hard about shooting this angle at this time of day. The house is¬†in the shade and typically you want sun on a building. But because of the surrounding trees, the house wouldn’t be in full sun until mid-day and that light would be really bad this time of year (shot mid summer). Late afternoon wouldn’t have worked either because the shadow lines would have created a lot more distracting angles on¬†the architecture.

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2nd Shot – Patio Detail

This was a quick pickup that we went for since the light was looking good. Setup was pretty fast as we were all set from the previous shot. Exteriors go quick. The first two shots were done in about 30 minutes.

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3rd Shot – Living Room

Though I love the look of mid-century modern, it’s typically a challenge to shoot the interiors. In this house, the wood walls and wood ceiling suck up a lot of light. In order to create the beautiful natural light look, I opened up 2 stops over the ambient light reading. This totally blow out the window frames, so I had my assistant walk around with a solid white reflector on the outside of the windows to cut the light at the window frames. This gave me some darker window frames to work with I photoshopped all the frames together for natural look and then used a separate outside exposure for the view. All told, I used 11 frames in the final composite. This shot took about an hour start to finish and about two hours in post.

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4th Shot – Fireplace Detail

This was a simpler shot lighting wise, but the styling took a little longer. Jessica and her designers totally rearranged the bookshelf to create a balanced look. One tip when moving homeowners stuff: Always take a before picture so you know where things go back. This shot took about 45 minutes

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5th Shot – Dining Room

This shot went pretty quick. I used available light and added a little fill from a strobe bounced off a white card on the right side of the frame to open up the dining room table and chairs. I always use fill light in interiors; meaning my light is under the main ambient exposure by a stop or two. This opens up the shadows, while not becoming the dominant light source. There’s nothing more unnatural looking than an overpowered strobe in an interior. We knocked this one out in about 30 minutes.

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6th Shot – Kitchen

The kitchen area serves¬†as a pass though from the dining room to the family room and bedrooms, which made it hard to find a good angle to shoot it from. We ended up at this spot because it best showed the height of the space and how it related to the dining room. I shot separate exposures for the open door and upper windows and dropped them in later. This shot went quick, maybe 3o minutes. After this shot, we took a lunch break for about 30 minutes. Don’t want to waste too much time when there’s more to shoot!

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7th & 8th Shot – Family Room

I put these up together since we shot them back to back over about an hour period. We shot two angles because one just didn’t explain this cool space well enough. The first is more of vignette and the second is more the room hero. I love both these shots. They feel so peaceful. Pillows and plants take a long time to style to look right. Fortunately, shooting live view speeds up the process because you can see changes in real time.

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9th Shot – Master Bath

The hardest part of this shot was that my camera and tripod were being reflected right in the middle of the shower’s glass wall. In post, I went in cloned out the reflection which was a little tricky with all that tile work. It was one of the those shots were post took more time than shooting it. This shot was all natural light. All in all, about 3o minutes to shoot and an hour of post.

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10th Shot – Bedroom Vignette

We liked this composition to show off the design elements, but a couple of the clocks on the wall were out of the frame. We wanted to show all the clocks together as a group, but didn’t want to put any new holes in the walls. To make it quick and easy, Jessica and her designers hand held two of the¬†clocks in place and I shot them standing in the middle of the room. I then photoshopped them out with a blank base frame. This is one of those times where it was faster (and less destructive) to do it in Photoshop than in reality. I used a fill light on the left because the room was so much darker than the bright¬†bathroom. About 30 minutes total on this shot.

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11th Shot – Carport

Not too much went into this shot. Mainly retouched out some oil stains on the concrete. Sweet car, huh? 15 minutes start to finish.

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12th Shot – Office

This is one my favorite office shots. Mainly, because it’s the office of amazingly talented¬†photographer Ty Milford. It’s fun to see another shooters¬†workspace and what they put up for inspiration. The room was shot available light, but I put a strobe in the hallway to brighten that up. 3o Minutes on this one.

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13th Shot – Kid’s Room

Small spaces are tricky to shoot. I don’t like to go too wide which¬†distorts everything and looks weird to me. So, I usually get back as far as possible, sometimes with camera pressed up against a wall and shoot just wide enough to get the key elements in place. We¬†didn’t do too much styling on this. Mainly, just tidied up and moved away some clutter. We spent about 3o minutes on this one.

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14th Shot – Powder Room Detail

On this shot, we all went back and forth about having the sconces on or not. The sconces were the only real light source and turning them off made it really dark. The only daylight was coming from down the hall and around the corner. When they were on, the sconces were distracting because your eyes went right to them and overpowered everything else. Ultimately, we ended up going with them off and shooting a long exposure (8 secs, f/13, iso 320) to create a brightness that wasn’t there in reality. To the human eye it looked dark, but with a camera you can see a lot more. Quick shot though, maybe 20 minutes.

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15th Shot – Hot Tub

Fairly simple styling on this shot. It mostly required some photoshop since the tub area was in shade and that blew out the view and the cool roof detail.¬†I never shoot HDR for this kind of work because you have so much more control if you shoot separate exposures work in layers. HDR gives you a little too much information and can kill a natural look. We took about 20 minutes to shoot this and I did not jump in the hot tub, despite it being so inviting. Still had another shot to do ūüėČ

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 16th Shot РMaster Bedroom from the Outside

Here’s another shot that I had to deal with reflections. I placed the camera and tripod on the center point of ¬†the door frame, so all I had to photoshop out was one leg being reflected. I had almost wrapped this shot when I went back to review and realized I was standing in reflection of the glass. So, I had to shoot all the brackets once more, but fortunately hadn’t moved the tripod.

And that’s a wrap. The day started 8:30am and we finished up at 6pm. This shoot was pretty typical for an interior design / residential architecture kind of shoot that I do. We were able to get through so many shots because Jessica and her team are awesome at styling and know what they want. We’ve also been working together for over 8 years and have¬†a good rapport. Most of my successful shots come from collaborating and great styling, whether by the client or an professional interior stylist.

Feel free to ask me any questions in the comments below.

Huge Portfolio Update!

Ahh… new work on the website. It feels good. I’ve been super busy the past¬†few years, not only with work, but with family, too. My son, Odin, was born in December of 2012 and my daughter, Teagan, was born in December of 2014. During¬†that stretch of time, I also had some of my busiest years to date with shoots from so many great clients like Hunter Douglas, Country Living,¬†OMSI, The Joinery, Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, Boora, Mahlum, Nike, and Rejuvenation to name a few. On top of that, we decided to move from Portland, OR to Charlottesville, VA to be closer to family last April. Yeah, crazy busy.

Since moving back to the East Coast, I’ve been traveling everywhere for work: California (3 times), Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia… I’ve traveled more for work this year than I have in the past 5 years. I feel very lucky to have a loving and supportive wife (and in laws) that’s allowed me to continue my career on the road.

Anyway, I finally found time to get a lot of new work online and I have SEVEN new portfolios to share with you. Quickly, they are Interiors, Exteriors, Details, Education, Workspaces, Lifestyle, Food Culture, and Food & Drink. This body of work represents the very best of my 13 year career. Here are some highlights and clicking on a photo will take you to the full gallery.

Lincoln Barbour Interiors Portfolio
Media Room by Maven Interiors

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Alhambra Kitchen by Jessica Helgerson Interior Design

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Hidden Modern Addition РShot for Dwell

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Rose City Flushmount by Rejuvenation Lighting & House Parts

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PCC East Library by SRG Partnership Inc

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Plurasight HQ by Roundhouse Agency

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Lifestyle Shoot for Hassalo on Eighth

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Andina Restaurant – Portland, OR

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Left: Food in Bloom, Right: Andina Restaurant

Thanks for checking out my new work and please let me know what you think in the comments below.

Interviewed on PhotoShelter

As you may or may not know, I’ve been a PhotoShelter customer for several years now. I love their service. It is, by far, the BEST way to show proofs to clients and deliver high rez finals. It also easily fits in to my digital workflow with Lightroom via a plugin, so using it saves me tremendous amounts of time and energy. Time and energy that I now spend focusing on my business, rather than mundane tasks that waste countless hours like creating Adobe web galleries, FTPing files, or (cringe) burning DVDs.

Every job I’ve delivered since 2010 is online high rez. Not only can my current clients redownload their images at any time, but I can quickly share and relicense available images to new customers. As a bonus, it also serves as an offsite backup in case something every goes terribly wrong at my office (knock on wood).

Anyway, when Lauren Margolis of PhotoShelter asked me to do in an interview about my architectural and interior photography, I jumped at the opportunity. I was totally flattered and I think the interview came out really great. Click the link below to read it on PhotoShelter’s blog:

Architectural Photography: Just Like Playing Tetris…Right?.

DLR Group – Scappoose HS Addition

It’s been a busy summer and I’m really excited to start showing some of the work I’ve been doing lately. If you’re wondering why I haven’t been blogging much, it’s because a lot of my shoots are under embargo until the images are published. This week, I’m going to recap some work from three very different clients.

This first project is an architectural shoot for long time client DLR Group. DLR is one of the top architecture firms in the country and their work has always been standout. This project in particular struck me as truly inspired design. I scouted this project in January and didn’t actually shoot it until May when we had better light. On the shoot, I worked closely with project designer Levi Patterson wangling kids, building furniture, and even moving a piano to get all these wonderful shots. The interior of the auditorium is one of the most striking spaces I’ve ever photographed. Here’s what DLR has to say about the project:

Connection. Identity. The Scappoose High School Auditorium is designed as a community center created to link the broader citizenry and the school; the architecture creates a point of connection for the students and the residents of Scappoose, Oregon to foster a shared identity. DLR Group designed the 400 seat auditorium so the connection between school and community would grow and inform through student and citizen performances, as well as student, local, and regional art display. The notion of the theatre lobby as a space to display public and student art was enriched with its additional use as the new public entry and commons. The relationship between connection and identity in the design are codependent; by inviting connection the design has created an identity that transcends physical materials and form, but is an identity of ownership by students and the community. The form of the auditorium is kinetic energy. The staccato rhythm of the performance hall massing, with the large fly loft and new entry volume, were envisioned to create the same experience as the lifting of keys after the last movement of a piano concerto; the reflection and memory, the breath, that accompanies the end of a powerful performance.

Are here are the rest of the shots for you architecture and design lovers: Continue reading “DLR Group – Scappoose HS Addition” »

My Clients Win Awards

Just found out one of my clients, Mahlum Architects, has won six design awards for their Springfield Elementary Schools project that I photographed for them this summer. The awards are…

  • AIA Southwest OR Chapter Peoples Choice Award
  • AIA Southwest OR Chapter Peoples Colleague Choice Award
  • AIA Southwest OR Chapter Honor Design Award
  • AIA Portland Chapter Merit Design Award
  • IIDA Portland Chapter Honor Award
  • IIDA Portland Chapter Juror Top Award

And here are the shots that helped win all those awards.

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Continue reading “My Clients Win Awards” »

Cover Feature in Spaces Magazine

The Windsor Court project I photographed for Jessica Helgerson has definitely got some legs. Besides for making the rounds on various blogs (including Design*Sponge), it’s been published several times in magazines all over the world.

So far, it’s been featured in Portland Monthly (US), Home Beautiful (Australia), and now the photographs are running as a cover story for UK magazine Spaces. If you’re in the US, I think you can pick up a copy of this February 09 issue at Barnes & Noble.

I’m really happy to see Jessica’s work be featured in so many places. And it’s certainly nice to get my photos published all over the world, too ūüėČ

Spaces has also run my bio on their website and I’ve been interviewed for a Q&A that will be coming out in their April issue. Will post that when it comes out.


Recent Work Featured on Design*Sponge

Recently, I photographed a remodeled home for my newest architectural client, Jessica Helgerson Interior Design. Jessica’s clean and modern design aesthetic was perfect for a young hip family relocating to Portland. From what she tells me, it was a pretty striking change between what the house was and what it is today. It was a real joy to photograph and we got some great shots.

An article about Jessica and the home was published today on Design*Sponge, a website dedicated to home and product design run by Brooklyn-based writer, Grace Bonney.

Here’s one of my favorites from the shoot.

UPDATE: Design*Sponge’s Grace Bonney spotlighted one of my photos of the EMP Museum at the end of last week. Thanks Grace!