Commissions

Industrial-Chic Shoot Featured on Dwell

I’m always so excited for my clients when one of their projects I shoot for them gets published on a major industry site. Last week it was the New York Times, this week my client Emerick Architects was featured on Dwell for this amazing industrial-chic Portland warehouse they remodeled. Definitely one of those #loftgoals kinds of places. Here’s a snippet from the article:

Blending raw industrial elements with elegant detailing, this one-of-a-kind home is a poster child for adaptive reuse.

Inspired by the loft conversions of TriBeCa, a pair of former New Yorkers were keen on an industrial-chic aesthetic when they purchased an 8,000-square-foot warehouse to serve as their new home in Southeast Portland. To bring their adaptive-reuse abode to life, the couple tapped local studio Emerick Architects,

Read the whole article here: https://www.dwell.com/article/division-street-residence-emerick-architects-b642d074

Want to Get Your Work Published?

Over the past 16 years, I’ve shot for and been published in the top home decor and architecture magazines. When you work with me, I will gladly help you promote your project to my exclusive list of photo editors, bloggers, and influencers.

Contact me today to book your next shoot.

 

“A Portland Craftsman, Cubed” Featured in New York Times

Ever have one of those projects that come together in a mystical kind of way? The signs are all there. The pieces fall into place just right. And you feel like you’re just meant to be there. That happened to me on this shoot for Bebee Skidmore Architects.

I first my Heidi Bebee and Doug Skidmore back in 2012 when I shot a story for Dwell in Boise, ID. They’re incredibly talented architects and their modern approach to remodeling older homes has become their signature style. And for good reason! They really have a unique vision and it’s very creative and fun.

It Gets Weird

Okay, here’s the woo woo stuff. Heidi and Doug reached out to me to photograph this project earlier this year. It had been shot already by another photographer, but they liked what I shot for them so much in that Dwell story, they wanted my take on shooting this project. (Side note: It doesn’t take much for me to want to go back to Portland. Hint. Hint. Wink. Wink.) So, when they send me the address, I notice the house is on Lincoln St. Of course it is. Then I meet the homeowners, Arrow and Jessica Kruse. My sister’s name is Jessica. Then I meet their kids, Odin and Alder. My son’s name is Odin and it’s not a very common name. Totally crazy set of coincidences! I just knew it was going to be an awesome shoot.

It Gets Better

Heidi and Doug were so excited by the photographs, that they didn’t want share them right away. Sounds counter-intuitive, right? They’re very smart and shopped the project around before posting it all over the web and what not. The New York Times picked up the story and the prolific architectural writer Brian Libby wrote a great article to go with the photos. You can read it here online right now at https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/realestate/a-portland-craftsman-cubed.html

Tips for Clients

If you have a special project that has potential for publication, DON’T put it on your website or social media right away. All the major magazines and newspapers love exclusive first rights to architecture and interior design stories. And if the photographs are shot in a well-crafted way (like the way I do), then it’s very likely that the magazine will license the photographs directly from the photographer and you find yourself in a a win-win situation. The magazine gets great images. You get great publicity. Everyone is happy.

Here’s some of favorites from the shoot including a few that didn’t run in the story.

Need Help Getting Great Images?

I wish I could shoot everything for everyone all the time. Reality is that I can’t. But I can help you make your shoots go better. I have a handy little guide called, “10 WAYS TO MAKE AN ARCHITECTURE SHOOT BETTER.”

It’s a free download! Just enter in your full name and email below and I’ll send it your way.

Hunter Douglas “Beauty Awakens” Ad Campaign

Okay, I’ve been excited to share things before, but this takes the cake. It’s the feather in my cap. It’s the bees knees to Nth degree. It’s the biggest ad campaign my work has been featured in… ever… or least in my 16 year career so far.

I’ve loved this shot ever since I took it for Hunter Douglas. It’s really me all summed up in one picture: architectural, great styling, people naturally placed, beautiful light, and technically superb. It’s flawless, yet relaxed… timeless, yet real.

And now, Hunter Douglas is using it as an iconic hero photograph in a massive fall print ad campaign. Over the next three months, you will see this double-page ad featured in the following magazines:

That’s a lot of ink! I just picked up some of the September issues. Guess what’s in all these magazines?

HD-Campaign_Covers

Boom!

HD-Campaign_Tears

Now, that’s how you do a brand awareness campaign.

When asked why they decided to go with this shot for the campaign, Hunter Douglas’ VP Creative Director, Donald Montgomery, simply said, “It’s the best shot we have.”

And I’m done. Drop the mic, exit stage left. Thank you to everyone helped me out on this shoot. I couldn’t have done it without you. Big hugs and high fives all around.

Stylist: Bergren Rameson
Photography Art Direction: Nicole Stowe – Ramey
Producer: Heather Smith – Smith X Union
Model: Nicole Herold
Location Scout: Lisa Rothmuller – San Diego Locations
Camera: Alpa XY with PhaseOne Digital Back from Capture Integration


Are you ready to make an iconic photograph for your brand?

Contact me today about your vision and I will make it happen for you.

Hunter Douglas Case Study

Summary

Since 2013, I’ve been hired by Hunter Douglas to help them create photography, time-lapse, and video for their dealer books, trade show materials, website, social media, in store display… basically everything. The first time I worked with them, they actually flew out to Portland just to meet me to see if we’d be a good fit. This was such a great idea considering the scope of the project and need to help me understand how they like to work. They work with a very select group of photographers and I needed to be vetted by them. I gave them a tour of the city and showed off some possible locations for the first shoot we did in Oregon. We definitely hit it off in that initial meeting and have had several successful shoots since then. I really enjoy shooting for Hunter Douglas because they are super dedicated to creating quality work. Quality is something I truly value as a person and a photographer/image maker.

For this blog post, I’d like to share a little of what it takes to do this level of production. I’ve spent my whole career getting to a point where I can offer this level of service. I have the experience, the resources, and the fortitude to handle anything that comes my way. This case study will help you get an idea of how working with me can achieve amazing results.

Pre-Production

One of the unique things about shooting for Hunter Douglas is that the shades we shoot are custom made for each location. Their high end product is designed to custom fit to any kind of window, so they have to manufacture them just for the shoot. My producer and I work with a location scout to find homes that fit the art direction for each product on the shot list. Once we’ve narrowed it down to 10-12 locations, the HD team and I come out for 2 day location scout trip. During the site visits, I’m looking for angles at each location and giving my ideas for how we can accomplish the goals for each shot. While we’re there, the installers work on measuring the windows to build the product for the shoot. After the scout, I organize the scouting photos and the HD team selects the final 4-5 locations and then starts manufacturing the product.

Now is when it really kicks in gear for me. Six weeks prior to shoot, we start having weekly pre-pro calls with my producer Heather Smith (www.smithandunion.com), the stylist, and the team at HD. We work with them on finalizing the shot list and help the stylist find resources for props and furniture. We run through all the scenarios and come up with a schedule for the shoot. Since we have to install the product, sometimes getting just one large room set can take half a day. Our last shoot had 15 hero shots and it took 14 days (we shot a lot of details and video, too). Finally, my producer and I hire the best crew, book all the equipment rental, and then find the most delicious food trucks available for catering. That’s right, work with me and you get treated!

The Shoot

I usually start with something easy, like a shot without a lot of prop changes and an easy product to install. I coordinate the HD installers so that they’re always ahead of us and I’m not waiting on them to setup the next shot. After we finish a shot, they then have to take down the product they put up. It’s quite a dance. Especially if we’re doing things like making a living room look like a bedroom.

On these shoots, I’m using a Phase One 100MP Medium Format Digital Back on an Alpa view camera. I love shooting with view cameras because every lens has the movements you need to shoot architecture properly in camera. Plus the lenses a extremely sharp and the level of detail is unparalleled to any DSLR. My photo crew includes a digital tech, a 1st assistant, and a 2nd assistant. Plus the production team has 3 or 4 PAs running around helping all of us move thing around. It’s a lot of fun and I have a great team. All of them working hard to help me create the vision for Hunter Douglas.

Retouching

After the shoot, I send off layered PSDs to HDs preferred retoucher with detailed notes on what needs to be retouched. It’s usually not much other than basic cleanup as I am a firm believer in getting it in camera as much as you can. Sometimes, we’ll make creative decisions that only retouching can solve, but I’ll save that for another blog post.

Results

Once the finals come back, they get put into Hunter Douglas’s image library and then go out to be used for multiple applications including dealer books, social media, sales presentations, and their website. It’s a big job, but my team and I make it come off easy, fun, and deliver the incredible images below.

HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_06 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_08 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_09HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_07 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_10 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_11 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_13 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_17 HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_19HunterDouglas17_Lincoln-Barbour_18 HunterDouglasWebsite_Lincoln-Barbour HunterDouglasWebsite_Lincoln-Barbour2 HunterDouglasWebsite_Lincoln-Barbour4

 

Do you need help with your photography project? I would love the opportunity to help you create beautiful images in a timely and stress free way. I’ve made a super easy booking form to get the information I need to get start. Just click the button below:

[gpp_button url=”https://www.lincolnbarbour.com/contact/” size=”large” color=”yellow”]BOOK NOW[/gpp_button]

Midcentury Modern Shoot Featured on Dwell

A few years back, I shot an incredible midcentury modern remodeled home for my client, Portland, OR based JHL Design. I really loved the shots we got from this shoot and apparently my client and I weren’t the only ones. Dwell.com recently featured the shooton their blog! Here’s a snippet from the before and after article:

An old home in Lake Oswego, Oregon, receives a modern makeover, while keeping its midcentury charm intact.

Oregon–based David Horning of MOA Architecture has joined forces with principal designer Holly Freres of JHL Design to carefully renovate the 1955 three-bedroom dwelling. By using period-appropriate materials, the team has not only restored the property to its original warmth and charm, but also infused a modern, contemporary vibe. To emphasize the home’s tranquil lakeside location, two 10-foot sliding doors have been added to the living room to enable a seamless connection to the outdoors.

Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

Check out the whole article here: https://www.dwell.com/article/before-and-after-a-midcentury-lakeside-home-receives-a-stunning-new-look-fa200630

Here’s a gallery of the “after” shots I took. The space is just stunning!

Shooting Gunlocke’s Saranac Launch and Metta Chair Brochure

A little while back, Rochester, NY based agency Truth Collective reached out to me to shoot for high end furniture maker, Gunlocke. The shoot took place in Buffalo, NY, near the Gunlocke manufacturing facility. They make all their furniture in the US and it’s craftsman quality work. I was really impressed by how passionate the client was about their products. It was a joy to photograph and they were great to work with.

The shoot had three parts which we shot over three days: an ad campaign with talent, multiple location shots, and a studio day to shoot product shots and details. We also built a set wall to convert an event space into a cool industrial office space.

We had a great crew for the shoot. I worked with local location scouts, assistants, and producer John Takacs. The prop and wardrobe stylist was the great Raina Kattelson out of NYC. And my digital tech, Esteban Aladro, also came up from NYC with lighting gear (thanks Este!). If you’re ever in Buffalo, NY and need a studio, I can’t say enough good things about DPost

We had a tight window to get all this work done and it wouldn’t have been possible without the great art direction of Karrie Gurnow of Truth Collective. She really knew what she wanted and we worked together really well. Super smooth shoot and the client was very happy with the results.

Here’s what I shot for Gunlocke: