architectural photography

Oregon Home – Houseboat Cover & Feature

If you’ve never been to Portland, you might not know of the copious amounts of houseboat communities. For this cover story for Oregon Home magazine, I got to visit three communites in the area. Each one was very different with it’s own set of character and charm. One common thread between them all, really nice people who love being on the water. [Read more…] about Oregon Home – Houseboat Cover & Feature

Behind the Scenes – Kids in Architecture

I’ve always had the philosophy that architectural photography is more interesting when you have a people in the shot. A person will give a sense of scale to the building or interior. It also helps you relate to what you’re seeing. And sometimes, it’s great just to have something to fill out the composition. In all cases, it makes the architecture feel more like a real place. It’s not always necessary to have people in the shot, but for many of my architectural clients, showing their design in use really helps them explain their aesthetic to their potential clients.

But, getting people to hold still in a natural pose for 3 to 4 seconds can be a challenge (interior exposures are always long). Often, I just let them go blurry. But there’s good blur and there’s bad blur. Getting good blur takes forethought, practice, and patience.

Here’s how I got some kids to hold still just enough for a shot at Otto Peteresen Elementary designed by DLR Group. It get’s pretty funny once they start “playing.” Who loves their clients? I do.

[vimeo video_id=”15059146″ width=”590″ height=”330″ title=”Yes” byline=”Yes” portrait=”Yes” autoplay=”No” loop=”No” color=”ffffff”]
(video shot by the very talented Jake Stangel)

And here’s how the final shot came out.

Architecture – Design & Spirit

Earlier this year, I was invited by Newspace Center for Photography to teach an architectural photography workshop. I was very honored and humbled that they thought of me. I’ve done a few other classes/workshops, but this was a full day class and much more involved than what I’ve done before. The class consisted of a presentation on the basics of architecture photography, followed by an afternoon photo walk where I helped each student set up their shots and demonstrated how to use tilt-shift lenses. I then gave them all various assignments to shoot on their own and we met the following week for a review.

It was a really great experience and I hope everyone who took the workshop got something out of it. It was certainly great for me to go back to all the basics and refresh my memory. As they say, “The best way to learn something is to teach it.”

Here is a PDF of the presentation I gave at the start of the class. I thought it would be worth sharing