Jessica Helgerson Interior Design

2016 in Review

Wow, where does the time go! This is my first “Year in Review” since 2011. Why the long drought? Well, the biggest change was that we welcomed our firstborn, Odin, in December of 2012. Two years later, came his sister Teagan in December of 2014. Three short months later, we moved back to Virginia to be closer to family. Yeah, it’s been a little busy.

2016 was my first full year back on the East Coast and it was a really good year for my business. It did come with some sacrifice though. Now that I’m based in a small town, I have to travel a lot more than I did when I was based in Portland. Of the 35 shoots I did last year, only 4 were in Charlottesville and just 16 in Virginia. I’ve flown more miles for work in the last two years than I did in the last 5 years I lived in Portland. I’ve had shoots in Buffalo, New York City, The Hamptons, LA, Silicon Valley, DC, Ohio, Maryland, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, San Diego, and have been back to Portland, OR 3 times. I was on the road or flying for 57 days in 2016 with one shoot lasting almost two weeks.

I really have to thank my wonderful wife, Lauren, and our family in Virginia for their support and help with our young family during this time of transition. I feel very grateful to have them so that I can do something I love for a living and that it’s able to help support a family of 4 (7 if you count our three cats ūüôā

On to the work. I have a lot of images to share and I’ll give a brief comment what each shoot was for. Coming soon will be a big update to my portfolios featuring work I’ve shot for Hunter Douglas, Better Homes & Gardens, Country Living, Prometheus Real Estate Group, and many more. Thanks for visiting and looking forward to an even better 2017.

Country Living Cover Feature – I actually shot this in 2015, but it wasn’t published until January of 2016. A cover feature is a really nice way to start the year. Shot in Franklin, TN (near Nashville), I had a great time on this shoot because it was a beautiful home to photograph and, more importantly, the owners were so friendly. They had that true Southern Charm that just makes you feel like you’ve known them for years.

One of my trips back to Portland included doing a shoot of Jessica Helgerson’s new office space in downtown. It’s amazing open space and the front lobby is used a gallery. When I shot it, the installation I HAVE LOVE IN MY HEART AS A THIEF HAS RICHES by Mike Rathbun was truly something to behold.

[Read more…] about 2016 in Review

Play by Play of a Full Day Interior Design Photo Shoot

Saul Zaik is well known¬†architect that’s famous for his Pacific¬†Northwest take on mid-century modern¬†design. He’s been practicing architecture since 1952 and I was lucky enough to photograph a Jessica Helgerson Interior Design remodel of one of his houses in the West Hills of Portland, OR.

For a different take on my typical blog post, I thought I’d do a play by play of each shot I took throughout the day and describe what it takes to pull off a typical one day interior design shoot.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1167

1st Shot – South Elevation
Since my client’s needs were¬†more interior design related, we only took one main exterior shot that showed off the work they did. This angle shows the new home color, new deck, and patio furniture. I debated long and hard about shooting this angle at this time of day. The house is¬†in the shade and typically you want sun on a building. But because of the surrounding trees, the house wouldn’t be in full sun until mid-day and that light would be really bad this time of year (shot mid summer). Late afternoon wouldn’t have worked either because the shadow lines would have created a lot more distracting angles on¬†the architecture.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1179

2nd Shot – Patio Detail

This was a quick pickup that we went for since the light was looking good. Setup was pretty fast as we were all set from the previous shot. Exteriors go quick. The first two shots were done in about 30 minutes.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1232

3rd Shot – Living Room

Though I love the look of mid-century modern, it’s typically a challenge to shoot the interiors. In this house, the wood walls and wood ceiling suck up a lot of light. In order to create the beautiful natural light look, I opened up 2 stops over the ambient light reading. This totally blow out the window frames, so I had my assistant walk around with a solid white reflector on the outside of the windows to cut the light at the window frames. This gave me some darker window frames to work with I photoshopped all the frames together for natural look and then used a separate outside exposure for the view. All told, I used 11 frames in the final composite. This shot took about an hour start to finish and about two hours in post.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1235

4th Shot – Fireplace Detail

This was a simpler shot lighting wise, but the styling took a little longer. Jessica and her designers totally rearranged the bookshelf to create a balanced look. One tip when moving homeowners stuff: Always take a before picture so you know where things go back. This shot took about 45 minutes

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1244

5th Shot – Dining Room

This shot went pretty quick. I used available light and added a little fill from a strobe bounced off a white card on the right side of the frame to open up the dining room table and chairs. I always use fill light in interiors; meaning my light is under the main ambient exposure by a stop or two. This opens up the shadows, while not becoming the dominant light source. There’s nothing more unnatural looking than an overpowered strobe in an interior. We knocked this one out in about 30 minutes.

 Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1280

6th Shot – Kitchen

The kitchen area serves¬†as a pass though from the dining room to the family room and bedrooms, which made it hard to find a good angle to shoot it from. We ended up at this spot because it best showed the height of the space and how it related to the dining room. I shot separate exposures for the open door and upper windows and dropped them in later. This shot went quick, maybe 3o minutes. After this shot, we took a lunch break for about 30 minutes. Don’t want to waste too much time when there’s more to shoot!

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1309 Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1336

7th & 8th Shot – Family Room

I put these up together since we shot them back to back over about an hour period. We shot two angles because one just didn’t explain this cool space well enough. The first is more of vignette and the second is more the room hero. I love both these shots. They feel so peaceful. Pillows and plants take a long time to style to look right. Fortunately, shooting live view speeds up the process because you can see changes in real time.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1339

9th Shot – Master Bath

The hardest part of this shot was that my camera and tripod were being reflected right in the middle of the shower’s glass wall. In post, I went in cloned out the reflection which was a little tricky with all that tile work. It was one of the those shots were post took more time than shooting it. This shot was all natural light. All in all, about 3o minutes to shoot and an hour of post.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1364

10th Shot – Bedroom Vignette

We liked this composition to show off the design elements, but a couple of the clocks on the wall were out of the frame. We wanted to show all the clocks together as a group, but didn’t want to put any new holes in the walls. To make it quick and easy, Jessica and her designers hand held two of the¬†clocks in place and I shot them standing in the middle of the room. I then photoshopped them out with a blank base frame. This is one of those times where it was faster (and less destructive) to do it in Photoshop than in reality. I used a fill light on the left because the room was so much darker than the bright¬†bathroom. About 30 minutes total on this shot.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1376

11th Shot – Carport

Not too much went into this shot. Mainly retouched out some oil stains on the concrete. Sweet car, huh? 15 minutes start to finish.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1392

12th Shot – Office

This is one my favorite office shots. Mainly, because it’s the office of amazingly talented¬†photographer Ty Milford. It’s fun to see another shooters¬†workspace and what they put up for inspiration. The room was shot available light, but I put a strobe in the hallway to brighten that up. 3o Minutes on this one.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1402

13th Shot – Kid’s Room

Small spaces are tricky to shoot. I don’t like to go too wide which¬†distorts everything and looks weird to me. So, I usually get back as far as possible, sometimes with camera pressed up against a wall and shoot just wide enough to get the key elements in place. We¬†didn’t do too much styling on this. Mainly, just tidied up and moved away some clutter. We spent about 3o minutes on this one.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1416

14th Shot – Powder Room Detail

On this shot, we all went back and forth about having the sconces on or not. The sconces were the only real light source and turning them off made it really dark. The only daylight was coming from down the hall and around the corner. When they were on, the sconces were distracting because your eyes went right to them and overpowered everything else. Ultimately, we ended up going with them off and shooting a long exposure (8 secs, f/13, iso 320) to create a brightness that wasn’t there in reality. To the human eye it looked dark, but with a camera you can see a lot more. Quick shot though, maybe 20 minutes.

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1437

15th Shot – Hot Tub

Fairly simple styling on this shot. It mostly required some photoshop since the tub area was in shade and that blew out the view and the cool roof detail.¬†I never shoot HDR for this kind of work because you have so much more control if you shoot separate exposures work in layers. HDR gives you a little too much information and can kill a natural look. We took about 20 minutes to shoot this and I did not jump in the hot tub, despite it being so inviting. Still had another shot to do ūüėČ

Saul-Zaik-House_LincolnBarbour-1459

 16th Shot РMaster Bedroom from the Outside

Here’s another shot that I had to deal with reflections. I placed the camera and tripod on the center point of ¬†the door frame, so all I had to photoshop out was one leg being reflected. I had almost wrapped this shot when I went back to review and realized I was standing in reflection of the glass. So, I had to shoot all the brackets once more, but fortunately hadn’t moved the tripod.

And that’s a wrap. The day started 8:30am and we finished up at 6pm. This shoot was pretty typical for an interior design / residential architecture kind of shoot that I do. We were able to get through so many shots because Jessica and her team are awesome at styling and know what they want. We’ve also been working together for over 8 years and have¬†a good rapport. Most of my successful shots come from collaborating and great styling, whether by the client or an professional interior stylist.

Feel free to ask me any questions in the comments below.

Back to Back Cover Features for GRAY

After a little blogging hiatus, it feels good to be writing again about what I’ve been up to lately. Got some good stuff in the queue covering personal work, photo business stuff, and lots of tearsheets. In fact, here are two cover features for GRAY Magazine that just ran back to back December/January and February/March.

GRAY Magazine December / January Cover Feature - Gothic Office by Jessica Helgerson

This cover features the awesomely moody Gothic Office I shot for Jessica Helgerson Interior Design last year. I was really happy to see the shoot run in print. GRAY does a really nice job on their printing and the shots really pop off the page.

Then for the February/March issue, GRAY picked up a shoot I did a few years ago that I loved. Many of these shots are in my portfolio.

Cover of GRAY Magazine #2

The newest architecture and design magazine to highlight the Pacific Northwest has certainly been generating a lot of buzz. Almost all my clients asked me about¬†GRAY Magazine¬†as soon as it hit their desks. And I can see why. It’s a really well designed magazine that is photo heavy with great articles. It’s also printed on really nice paper for that high end feel.

GRAY is up to issue #3, but I was pretty stoked to have this project I photographed for Jessica Helgerson Interior Design run as the cover story for their second issue. The rest of the tearsheets are below, but if you want to see the photographs on their own, check out the White Brick Mediterranean Home gallery on my archive.

Twenty Eleven – A Year of Work

I’m a little late for an end of year review, but here it is none the less. Speaking purely from a financial point of view,¬†2011 was a lot like 2010 in that it was way better than 2009, but not quite as good as 2008. However, the photographs I created in 2011 are some of my best yet and I’ve never had more fun being a photographer. I really feel like my style and approach are starting to gel and I’m looking forward to what 2012 and beyond brings. Here are some of my favorite shots from last year.

Thank you to all my clients for making this year so great. You all are a truly a pleasure to work for and I look forward to many more projects together.

Also, thank you to all the stylists, models, assistants, art directors, photo editors, art buyers, and marketing directors I’ve worked with this year. The success of all these shoots wouldn’t have been possible without your collaboration.

Finally, a special shout out to Justin Tunis and Daniel Cronin for being two excellent go to assistants. Thank you for your hard work, your professionalism on set, and being easy to travel with. I’ll be calling you soon.