Lincoln Barbour

“I” Becomes “We”

Announcing LINCOLN BARBOUR STUDIO

For much of my 18-year career, I have thought about my business as the lone photographer model. It’s been centered around just what I could do with my own hands. I’ve become an architectural and commercial photography expert and now have over 1000 shoots under my belt. I’ve shot for firms like ZGF, DLR Group, and IDL and for brands like Hunter Douglas, Rejuvenation, and Hilton.

Now that I’m 43 and looking ahead to the future of my business, I’ve decided to change the nature of what I can offer to the world. To transform the business from “I” to “We”. To work alongside a team of highly creative and talented people that will help me expand my services for the AEC and Home Decor markets I mainly serve. To grow the business beyond just my talents. To take my careful attention to detail, thoughtful preparation, and easy-going nature and scale it up, if you will.

IDL Portland

I’ve already been doing this sort of thing by outsourcing production services like casting, prop styling, location management, and set making on larger commercial jobs. Yet, the core of my business has always been centered around making high-quality images of architecture and home decor.

Over the past year, I started to ask myself these questions: How else can I serve my clients? How can I help them with their imaging needs beyond the finished product? How can they get more value from working with me and my team? The more I asked myself these questions, the more I came back to the architectural lifecycle.

Design > Plan > Build > Deliver

What if I could offer imaging services at each of these stages? What if a client could have a consistent level of quality of imaging from a trusted partner; from someone who understands the end product as much as the beginning?

The answer to these questions came to me with two key findings:

Reality Capture

Enhanced Virtual Tours

Reality Capture is the process of using specialty cameras to scan and collect images and data of as-built conditions. These scans can be used to create enhanced virtual tours that not only allow you to virtually walk around a space but also get measurements of that space that are 97-99% accurate. In addition, the data we collect during a scan can be exported to XYZ Color Point Cloud and used in CAD workflow to create Scan to BIM outputs like schematic floor plans, elevations, a digital twin of the final project, and more.

We are proud to announce Reality Capture services are now available. Click here to learn more.

CGI Renderings

Full CGI Rendering

With recent advances in CGI (computer-generated imaging), photo realistic renders of architecture and home decor are finally possible at an affordable price. The CGI artists we work with can take your existing CAD files or PDF Floorplans and create a beautiful lifelike 3D model of your design. For Architects and Interior Designers, these renderings can be used to help you win your projects or previsualize the finished project. For Home Decor brands, the renders can replace having to photograph prototypes and can be used in everything from brochures to advertising.

To learn more about our CGI Services and see examples, click here.

Here for You at Any Stage

Combining these two services with my long history of architectural photography and retouching allows us to become a true full-service studio of architectural imaging. A studio dedicated to delivering the highest quality images and data for the needs of architects, interior designers, construction companies, engineers, and home decor brands.

 

Let’s take a journey together so you can see how our services all work together to benefit you.

Imagine you are working on a 10,000 sq ft interior remodeling project of a commercial building. In order to accurately estimate the project, you need it measured. Rather than go to the project and measure everything by hand, you send our Reality Capture team out to do the initial scan. Within 24 hours, we deliver to you  4K 3D virtual tour and a schematic floor plan of the as-built conditions. You feel confident in your bid because you know the costs are accurate based on the measurements taken. All your subs have looked at the space and are happy that they don’t have to visit the site in person just for a bid. You’re saving everyone time and money.

Now imagine you’ve won the job. Congrats! We can then take the original 3D Scan and convert the Point Cloud to a Revit or AutoCAD file ready for you to work on your remodel designs. Once you’re happy with your design work, you pass the file back to us and we will create a photo-realistic rendering for you. This way, if your client wants to see what furniture will look like in the space or if they want to see different options for the wall color. The renders give you and your client a clear vision of the finished project.

And now the construction phase begins. Because of your busy schedule, you can’t make it to the job site every week. Instead, you send our Reality Capture team to do weekly construction updates. You can keep an eye on the progress and discuss problems that may arise once the walls are opened up. You’ll be able to see what your contractor is seeing on-site. You can share the progress with your client and many of their questions can be answered with a quick glance rather than everyone taking time out of their day to visit the site. You can even tag points of interest like virtual blue tape for the punch list.

Finally, the remodel is complete and it’s ready to be photographed. Since we have been part of the process from the beginning, we already know the shots we’ll be taking and you won’t need to make a scouting visit. During the shoot, we will capture everything to a laptop workstation and compare the photos to the virtual tours and renderings. The final photos will be beautiful and our intimate knowledge of the project will help us capture the true spirit of the project.

After the photoshoot, we will retouch the images to enhance the look and remove distracting elements like exit signs and sprinkler heads. We will also follow up with the final scan and create a virtual tour as a gift to the client and as a record of delivery. The model can be used on your own website as a portfolio piece or a case study to pull out during presentations.

Now that is full-cycle architectural imaging.

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting video presentations of our new reality capture services. Please join our mailing list or subscribe to the blog to stay in the loop and learn more.

In the meantime, no matter where you are in the architectural lifecycle, we are here to help you with your imaging needs.

Please contact us today to get started.

Thank you!

Lincoln

What are the Four Types of Photographers

The other day, my barber asked me: “So what do you do?”

I told him I was a photographer, so he proceeded to tell me all about his buddy who shoots weddings. And while I wanted to relate on this shared commonality, I had to be honest with myself: shooting weddings is extremely different from shooting commercially.

As I was searching for a way to explain the difference, it dawned on me: All service-based businesses use similar “tools” in their jobs, but how they use the tools varies wildly.

For example: a plumber and a mechanic both use a wrench, yes, but would you hire your plumber to fix your car? Tools are just that: Tools.

In that same vein, just because a photographer carries around a camera doesn’t mean he or she possesses the necessary skill set to approach each assignment with the same level of expertise. As for me, I’m primarily an Architectural Photographer. Over the past two decades, I’ve filled my toolbox with the knowledge required to approach each assignment with care and consideration. If you need me to beautifully photograph a building with expert technical precision, I’m your man. If you need me to shoot your daughter’s senior portrait, I’m going to pass; frankly, I don’t know the first thing about shooting a teenager’s portrait.

To break it down, I feel there are four basic types of professional photographers, each of which can be very general or very niche. So, before you hire a photographer for your next project, take note of the following.

Commercial Photographer

Photo from my last shoot for Hunter Douglas

Commercial photographers are B2B. They know how to work with other businesses, collaborate in teams, and acquire the resources needed to pull off complex shoots with detailed creative briefs.

Need to secure a location permit and close down a street?! A commercial photographer knows a guy who knows a guy. But if you ask that commercial photographer to shoot your wedding, he’s going to overthink it and probably have you walk down the aisle repeatedly to get the shot just right.

Photojournalist

Photo from Leah Nash’s series about Asperger Syndrome – www.leahnash.com

Photojournalists prime responsibilities include reporting on the news and shooting documentary photo essays. The ones I’ve met are some of the most talented, hardworking, and dedicated people with a camera.

But if you want them to shoot an architectural project, photojournalists are going to approach it like a war zone: “Shoot first, ask questions later.” They also probably wouldn’t even retouch it because to them, it would be unethical.

Retail Photographer (Weddings, Portraits, B2C)

Jen Fariello Photography – www.jenfariello.com

Wedding & Portrait photographers are typically B2C: they get hired by brides and grooms, families, pet owners – basically, the whole gamut of consumers. Some W&P photographers will also dabble in commercial work like headshots for businesses. But their core specialty is the consumer and they are great one-on-one, just like a boutique business should be.

However, if you have an ad campaign to shoot, a wedding photographer is probably not going to have the resources to find a producer, cast talent, and pull permits for locations. I’m sure they know a really killer band and a wonderful caterer though.

Art Photographer

Photo from Holly Andres series “Fieldcrest Drive” www.hollyandres.com

Even though photography is an art form, not all photographers are what I would call “artists”. In fact, I would consider most photographers to be craftsmen – myself included. They dedicate their careers to perfecting the craft and creating photographs for others’ use. Art photographers, on the other hand, shoot purely to create some of the meaning for themselves. Their work is an expression of their feelings. If you hire an art photographer to shoot your ad campaign, you’re letting them lead the vision and direct the creative. But, if you already have a clear creative vision in mind, then you’re better off finding a commercial photographer who can execute it properly.

Next Steps: Vet the Photographer

Now that you know the four types of photographers, you’ll be much better off finding the right person (or studio) for your next shoot. But before making your hire, you should ask them some questions to find out if they’re a pro or an amateur.

Questions like:

  • Can I see a full shoot (proofs and final images)?
  • Do you carry liability insurance?
  • Do you shoot RAW or JPEG?
  • How do you backup files from your shoot?
  • What can expect before, during, and after the shoot?
  • Have you shot this kind of job before?
  • How much retouching do you do?

How can I help you?

Do you have an upcoming commercial photography project you need help on? Contact me today and I will gladly help you out. If I’m not a good fit, I have some great recommendations for you. Click here to go to my contact page.

114,000 Monthly Viewers on Pinterest

Normally, I use Pinterest for posting work, creating private mood boards with clients, and helping me remember where to buy the gear I need. A funny thing happened the other day though that made my mouth drop. I looked at my page and I receive 114,000 monthly viewers of my work that I post. Wow, thank you Pinterest fans! In hindsight, it makes sense. Pinterest is the place to go and store mood boards for interior design and décor inspiration. So, of course many eyeballs will be seeking out the type of photography I specialize in. It’s very enlightening and I’m dedicating part of my marketing efforts to foster it and help it grow more.

Country Living Cover Feature January 2016

Country_LivingJan2015_Cover

2016 is off to a great start with this cover feature for Country Living. I didn’t know it was going to be the cover when I shot last year and found out shortly before it went to press. After 14 years of shooting and getting published, it’s still very rewarding to see your work in print on a newsstand.

I had a great time at this shoot. I was in Franklin, TN for two full days of shooting. The charming rustic look of the house was really fun to photograph. Jami Supsic, Style Director for Country Livingbrilliantly staged the shots and was super helpful in art direction, too. The homeowners, Mandy and Randy Reeves, were so friendly and hospitable. They didn’t even mind when we rearranged their living room for the cover try. Southern Charm at it’s best.

These kinds of shoots are team efforts and when you have a great team, the end results are fantastic. Here are the spreads from the feature story. Click to enlarge and enjoy!

 

Huge Portfolio Update!

Ahh… new work on the website. It feels good. I’ve been super busy the past few years, not only with work, but with family, too. My son, Odin, was born in December of 2012 and my daughter, Teagan, was born in December of 2014. During that stretch of time, I also had some of my busiest years to date with shoots from so many great clients like Hunter Douglas, Country Living, OMSI, The Joinery, Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, Boora, Mahlum, Nike, and Rejuvenation to name a few. On top of that, we decided to move from Portland, OR to Charlottesville, VA to be closer to family last April. Yeah, crazy busy.

Since moving back to the East Coast, I’ve been traveling everywhere for work: California (3 times), Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia… I’ve traveled more for work this year than I have in the past 5 years. I feel very lucky to have a loving and supportive wife (and in laws) that’s allowed me to continue my career on the road.

Anyway, I finally found time to get a lot of new work online and I have SEVEN new portfolios to share with you. Quickly, they are Interiors, Exteriors, Details, Education, Workspaces, Lifestyle, Food Culture, and Food & Drink. This body of work represents the very best of my 13 year career. Here are some highlights and clicking on a photo will take you to the full gallery.

Lincoln Barbour Interiors Portfolio
Media Room by Maven Interiors

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Alhambra Kitchen by Jessica Helgerson Interior Design

Lincoln_Barbour-Exteriors-05
Hidden Modern Addition – Shot for Dwell

Lincoln_Barbour-Details-07
Rose City Flushmount by Rejuvenation Lighting & House Parts

Lincoln_Barbour-Learn-09
PCC East Library by SRG Partnership Inc

Lincoln_Barbour-Work-07
Plurasight HQ by Roundhouse Agency

Lincoln_Barbour-Live-04
Lifestyle Shoot for Hassalo on Eighth

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Andina Restaurant – Portland, OR

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Left: Food in Bloom, Right: Andina Restaurant

Thanks for checking out my new work and please let me know what you think in the comments below.

Twenty Years of Picture Making

Lincoln Barbour in High School

Today is my 36th birthday. Which means, 20 years ago I took my first black and white photography class in high school. Though I chose photography as career only 12 years ago, there’s something about the picture making process that has fascinated me since the beginning. I think what I like most about photography is that it never ceases reinventing itself nor does it ever stop challenging me. Not matter how much I master the art form, I constantly want to learn more to improve what I can do with it.

As my approach and style have evolved over the years, I too have changed and grown as a man. I was a kid when I took the picture above and now I’m a dad in the picture below. Photography has always been this reflection of my life and each frame leaves breadcrumbs of where I’ve been and who I was. Going back and looking at work I’ve shot over the years, shows me how far I’ve come and how much farther I can go.

Here’s to the next 20 years of adventure, one frame at a time.

– Lincoln

Lincoln Barbour